Word of the day: Uncouth

Here’s a useful word I employed in You May Kiss the Bride. Infographic: "uncouth" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

 

My heroine, Livia, betrothed to Gabriel Penhallow, hears the name Alasdair Penhallow mentioned, and asks who that is. Gabriel’s haughty, cantankerous grandmother replies with a sniff:

“He is Gabriel’s cousin, and the head of the Scottish branch of the Penhallows — we here in England have nothing to do with them as they are a backward, uncouth lot. This Alasdair is evidently an utter wastrel and is known, among our own intimate circle, as the black sheep of the family. A highly appropriate term, given the Clans’ apparent obsession with their sheep. For myself, I have never cared for mutton, but Dr. Wendeburgen says under extreme circumstances, such as a fit of sneezing that lasts more than an hour, consuming it in pureed form is of the utmost urgency.”

You’ll meet Alasdair in my next book, The Laird Takes a Bride. You’ll have to decide for yourself if old Mrs. Penhallow is correct in her estimation of him . . .

In the meantime, if you’d like to read an excerpt from You May Kiss the Bride, click here. You can also enter Avon Books’ Goodreads giveaway for 10 print advance reader copies; click here to enter. Good luck!

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