Word of the day: Hackle

I like this word a lot; it’s a fun way to illuminate a character’s hostility. Graphic: "hackle" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

I used it in You May Kiss the Bride, in a scene during which my protagonists, Livia Stuart and Gabriel Penhallow, are discussing his high-handed decision that theirs is to be a marriage in name only. Livia says:

“You’re supposed to be marrying in order to—how did your grandmother put it in her letter to Lady Glanville?—oh yes, to ensure the succession. How will you do that now, I wonder?”

He took his time responding, for he was analyzing her tone. It wasn’t one he heard often. It was—impudence. Brazen impudence. If he had hackles, he thought, they’d be rising right now. Coolly he said, “That’s my problem, isn’t it, Miss Stuart? Not yours.”

This scene takes place in Chapter 5, but if you like, you can read all of Chapter 1 here.

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