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THE LATEST FROM LISA BERNE

Abandoned Books

*sob*

Cartoon by Tom Gauld: Abandoned Books

by Tom Gauld

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The Museum of Broken Relationships

I was fascinated to read an article about the Museum of Broken Relationships, which houses “artifacts from failed unions, most of them mundane under ordinary circumstances. A single stiletto heel. A wine opener. A worn old Snoopy doll. But when isolated in a glass case or hanging on a white wall and accompanied by a caption, the objects become imbued with heartache or regret. Or freedom.” As an avid museum-goer, I’d love to visit.

A photograph taken at the Museum of Broken Relationships: visitors looking at a display of "brokenship" artifacts.

via the Museum of Broken Relationships

Of course, one of the great joys in my profession is to ensure that no matter what obstacles my protagonists encounter, all will end well. Hmmmm. Maybe they should stock some romance novels in the gift shop . . . ?

More about the “brokenships” museum here.

 

 

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“Hot galley right here”

Oh my goodness, You May Kiss the Bride is on Snapchat! And all dolled up, too.

Image: a bound-galley of You May Kiss the Bride by Lisa Berne, posted on Snapchat by Avon Romance

Just so you know — those aren’t my kiss-marks there. But they might have been if I’d had the chance. ;)

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Cosmopolitan, Regency style? Yes, please!

Hahaha, I’d totally subscribe to this.

Image: a mock edition of Cosmopolitan magazine, with a Regency-era twist

via the Jane Austen Centre on Twitter

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Word of the day: Maelstrom

Here’s a fantastic word for a romance writer, as our work is imbued with emotions of all kinds, and often very strong ones.Infographic: "Maelstrom": a word-of-the-day from Merriam-Webster.

In fact, I used it in You May Kiss the BrideMy hero, Gabriel Penhallow, who has previously taken great pride in his cool sangfroid, has just had a public — and widely observed — altercation on a busy street in Bath, during which he effectively rips to shreds the character of a man whose carriage has nearly run over my heroine Livia:

So much for his vaunted self-control, he thought bitterly. The last time he’d allowed himself to give way to such a violent maelstrom of emotions, he’d ended up kissing a saucy, tempting girl in a garden and within the hour been engaged to her. And here she’d done it once more.

This snippet is from Chapter 9, but you if you like, you can read Chapter 1 here.

 

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Some beautiful images from Pride & Prejudice

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice plays a small role in You May Kiss the Brideso I was especially delighted to come across these images from the Folio Society’s recently published edition of P & P. Aren’t they spectacular?

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy dancing, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet being confronted by Lady Catherine, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet looking at a portrait of Mr. Darcy, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

 

The artists are Anna and Elena Balbusso. More here.

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It was a dark and stormy night . . .

Although I don’t write gothic romance, I’ve certainly read it, and I adore this evocative image. Are these steps ones you’d want to go up . . . or hastily down, and away?

Gothic-style illustration of an old manor house by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

Illustration by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

 

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Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow

So, yeah, we’ve been having a lot of snow lately.

Photo: "Clayton Conrad walks past the 22-foot-tall Olaf snowman Wednesday in his front yard . . . in Spokane Valley." Via the Spokesman-Review

“It’s not finished yet,” Clayton Conrad says about his 22-foot-tall snowman in the front yard of his Spokane Valley home. Via the Spokesman-Review.

 

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And later on . . .

This makes me smile.
Photo of a baby and a large dog looking at each other; the caption reads "And later on . . . when you learn to walk and run, we can chase cats!"

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Word of the day: Baleful

Another excellent word for a romance writer, in whose work tensions often run high. A Merriam-Webster infographic, with a definition for the word "baleful"

I used it at least once, in adverbial form, in You May Kiss the Bride:

Livia looked balefully at the rumpled heap of expensive, fragile gowns lying on the floor. So Cecily thought one of her old cast-offs might suit her for the ball? And Lady Glanville thought that she’d be thrilled, grateful, to peek out from behind a potted palm to enjoy a glimpse of luxury?

Well, they were wrong. 

Dead wrong. 

Livia jumped to her feet and went over to the gowns. She snatched them up and shoved them onto a low shelf of her armoire. 

She was not going to the ball. 

This snippet appears in Chapter 1. You can read the full excerpt here.

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