News & blog

THE LATEST FROM LISA BERNE

Last night’s supper

Because breakfast is always more fun in the evening.

Photo: a "smiley face" comprised of an omelet, a sausage, and two English muffins

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The Wedding Dress

What a sad image! Still, it would make a wonderful illustration for an opening chapter in a romance novel, wouldn’t it? Things look bad for the heroine. But we know — for sure — that it will all end up OK. No, more than OK: it’ll be great.

"The Wedding Dress" by Frederick William Elwell, 1911.

“The Wedding Dress” by Frederick William Elwell, 1911

Which is just one reason why I love reading (and writing!) romance.

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You’ve got questions? I’ve got answers!

If you happen to be wondering what I’m currently working on, my strategy for dealing with writer’s block, where I got my idea(s) for You May Kiss the Bride, how I get inspired to write, and if I have any advice for aspiring writers, hop on over to my Goodreads page!

Cover for YOU MAY KISS THE BRIDE by Lisa Berne (Avon/HarperCollins)

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How grapes are made

I’ve always wondered, haven’t you? ;)

Photo via Minimiam: how grapes are made

 

More whimsy from the Minimiam artists here.

 

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Word of the day: Cantankerous

In You May Kiss the Bride, my hero’s grandmother, Henrietta Penhallow, is definitely cantankerous: she’s arrogant, domineering, and critical.

Infographic: "cantankerous," via Merriam-Webster

 

Here’s a little snippet from Chapter 5, during which my heroine, the penniless orphan Livia Stuart, has begun — under the aegis of old Mrs. Penhallow — her transformation into an elegant Society miss.

One morning, after several new items had arrived (including, to Livia’s intense gratification, a pair of kid slippers with ravishing pink rosettes), she said impulsively to Mrs. Penhallow:

“All this, ma’am, for me? I must thank you.”

The old lady had somehow managed despite her inferior height to look down her nose at Livia. “It is not for, or about, you, young lady,” she replied with her usual hauteur. “Never think that for a moment. It is merely that you are to represent the Penhallows, and standards must be upheld.”

Temporarily cowed by this frigid set-down, Livia submitted to successive applications of Lotion of Ladies of Denmark, Milk of Almonds, and the distilled water from green pineapples, her complexion having been pronounced shockingly brown, and also to the rose oil and white wax for lips deemed repulsively dry and chapped.

Poor Livia!

Want to read a longer excerpt from You May Kiss the Bride? Click here for Chapter 1.

 

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The one book I can’t wait to read

When I was invited to contribute to this year’s Avon Author Reading Wish List, did I hesitate? Not for a second. Because — hurray! — Loretta Chase has a new book coming out this year!

Avon Romance logo

Katharine Ashe, Sophie Barnes, Megan Frampton, Laura Lee Guhrke, Beverly Jenkins, Jennifer Ryan, Lynsay Sands, and Lori Wilde also shared their Wish List choices. My TBR stack just got bigger . . .

You can read the Wish List here.

 

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Dragon bed

This image floated across my Twitter feed, and I had to stop and stare at it in admiration.

Photo: a miniature dragon bed made by Michael Reynolds.

Via Traceyanne McCartney on Twitter

Of course, I spent some time wondering if I could somehow write in a bed like this into one of my books. Nothing immediately springs to mind, but you never know . . .

Then I had to learn more. This is an amazingly teeny-tiny little bed, the artist is Michael Reynolds, and he is evidently a member of the International Guild of Miniature Artisans which has a bewitchingly fascinating Instagram. Enjoy!

 

 

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I will not buy any more books . . .

Bookworm problems."I will not buy any more books until I've read all the ones I've got:" via Someecards

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On bagpipes, and my next book

So in my next book, The Laird Takes a Bride, there’s a reference to bagpipes which I gotta say is one of the single best lines I’ve ever written.

"Pipe Practice" by William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1918): a painting of three men with bagpipes.

“Pipe Practice” by William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1918). Via Helen Warlow on Twitter.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work to share it out of context. Which probably makes this a totally unfair teaser. But the good news is that The Laird Takes a Bride arrives this summer! I’m so looking forward to sharing more about it with you as we get closer.

In the meantime, you can preorder the Kindle edition here. (More info about other formats coming soon.)

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Mary Balogh: “I believe in love”

I’ve just read a fantastic post by Mary Balogh on why she writes historical romance; it speaks eloquently to me as both a reader and a writer.

She begins by saying, “I believe in love. I believe in the power and ultimate triumph of love.”

And why historical romance in particular?

“Readers like to be transported away from their everyday lives. They like to be taken to a different world to read about people who are essentially like themselves. Past eras often seem more romantic than our own. Regency England, for example, conjures marvelous visual images of fashions for both men and women that weA Regency-era ballre perhaps the most attractive and sexy of any age; of stately country homes and the spacious parks surrounding them; of horse-drawn carriages bowling along the king’s highway; of couples waltzing at grand balls in the light of dozens of candles in the crystal chandeliers overhead; of enchanted evenings strolling the lantern-lit walks of Vauxhall Gardens in London; of picnics and garden parties in rural surroundings; of drives in Hyde Park at the fashionable hour. The possibilities are endless, all coming with an aura of the romance of a bygone age. It is a happy illusion, of course. Most of us would not want actually to live in Regency England or any other bygone era, but we are quite happy to enjoy it from the comfort of our twenty-first century homes. That is the magic of reading.”

Click here to read the full post.

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