Archive for 'books'

Some beautiful images from Pride & Prejudice

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice plays a small role in You May Kiss the Brideso I was especially delighted to come across these images from the Folio Society’s recently published edition of P & P. Aren’t they spectacular?

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy dancing, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet being confronted by Lady Catherine, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet looking at a portrait of Mr. Darcy, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

 

The artists are Anna and Elena Balbusso. More here.

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It was a dark and stormy night . . .

Although I don’t write gothic romance, I’ve certainly read it, and I adore this evocative image. Are these steps ones you’d want to go up . . . or hastily down, and away?

Gothic-style illustration of an old manor house by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

Illustration by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

 

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Some gorgeous book covers

I love looking at book covers; it’s total eye candy for me. Here are some of my recent faves from Avon. Aren’t they gorgeous?!?

cover of RULES FOR A ROGUE by Christy Carlyle (Avon/HarperCollins)

cover of LADY BE BAD by Megan Frampton (Avon/HarperCollins)

cover of WHILE THE DUKE WAS SLEEPING by Sophie Jordan (Avon/HarperCollins)cover of BLAME IT ON THE DUKE by Lenora Bell (Avon/HarperCollins)

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People who use bookmarks . . . and monsters

I have to admit two things. One: I’m a total bookmark person. (Almost anything will work in a pinch: envelopes, receipts, a movie ticket, Post-it notes, a piece of string . . .) Two: I have gotten huffy when people have dog-eared books I’m fond of.

A cartoon: There are two types of people. People who use bookmarks . . . and monsters.

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My entire childhood

I’m so wowed by this. It feels like my entire childhood, coalesced into a single image.

Illustration showing the imaginative power of books and reading.

via Helen Warlow on Twitter

 

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A bookish holiday wreath!

Further holiday merriment: a bookish wreath! I wonder what book this clever crafter utilized . . . ?

Photo of a holiday wreath made from book pages. Posted by Sarah's Book Reviews on Twitter.

via Sarah’s Book Reviews on Twitter

More crafty holiday DIY inspiration here at Modern Mrs. Darcy.

 

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Happy birthday, Ma!

I’m a day late, but yesterday was the birthday of Caroline Ingalls — Ma in the Little House series. A towering, indelible figure of my childhood reading: stern but loving, a little mysterious, hardworking, and almost supernaturally resourceful.

A photograph of Caroline Ingalls, mother of Laura Ingalls Wilder, the author of the Little House series of children's books

Pa & Ma: photo via Little House Prairie on Twitter

More about “Ma” here: “Mother, A Magic Word.”

 

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Some helpfully abridged classics

For those of us short on time.

"(even more) abridged classics": a comic by John Atkinson, Wrong Hands

via John Atkinson, Wrong Hands

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Fight for the fairy tale

This is a kind of manifesto, isn’t it — for writers and readers of romance?

"Fight for the fairy tale": a meme by Joy F.

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A holiday book-tree

Theresa Romain, a fellow author of historical romance, made a tree out of books! I’m picturing it with a few strands of colored lights, a little tinsel draped here and there . . . and some more books (wrapped, of course) around the base. Because books make great gifts, don’t they? ;)

A holiday "book-tree" made by Theresa Romain, author of historical romance.

 

More about Theresa here.

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