Archive for 'fellow authors'

Book love: Recipe for Redemption

I recently had the pleasure of reading a fantastic contemporary romance novel, Recipe for Redemption, by Anna J. Stewart. Anna’s writing style is so compulsively readable, and her characters so vividly drawn, that I absolutely had to read this in one sitting. Cover for RECIPE FOR REDEMPTION by Anna J. Stewart (Harlequin)And Anna’s got a new book coming out in May, which I’m super-excited to read. Check out this stunning cover!

Cover for REUNITED WITH THE P.I. by Anna J. Stewart (Harlequin)

To learn more about Anna and her other books, click here.

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If Mrs. Bennet had email

If you’ve been following my blog you know I’m a big Jane Austen fan. And so when this hilarious graphic floated across my Twitter feed, I pounced on it so I could share it with you here. Graphic: "If Mrs. Bennet Had Email," via Mark BrownlowThe brilliant mind behind it is Mark Brownlow. More about him and his work here.

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“Prepare to be swept away!”

So happy to share with you these kind words of praise from a fellow writer I admire so much — the wildly talented Lenora Bell, author of the acclaimed How the Duke Was Won and If I Only Had a Duke. Here’s what Lenora has to say about my own You May Kiss the Bride: 

Graphic: Lenora Bell on You May Kiss the Bride (Avon Books, April 2017): "Prepare to be swept away! Lisa Berne's sensuous, richly imaginative debut will delight and satisfy you. I savored every page!"

I’m super-excited to read Lenora’s third book in the Disgraceful Dukes series, Blame It on the Duke, which releases April 17th (soon!). More about Lenora here.

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Shop talk: unusual happy-ever-afters

Really enjoyed this thought-provoking post by Lorraine Heath, “When the HEA Isn’t Quite What We Expect,” on Heroes and Heartbreakers. “The value in unusual Happily-Ever-Afters is that they can dare us to believe in the possibility of so much more, change our perspective, or elicit a profound emotion,” says Lorraine. “They can help to keep the genre fresh, broaden its horizons, and allow authors to step out of their comfort zone. . . . if reading romance teaches us anything at all, it’s that there are rewards to be found in taking risks.”

Also — Lorraine’s latest was released yesterday! Check out this amazing cover!Cover of When the Marquess Falls by Lorraine Heath

Click here to read Lorraine’s post in full. And here for info on how to order When the Marquess Falls.

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Shop talk: Meredith Duran & Sabrina Jeffries

RT Book Reviews recently posted a fascinating conversation between Sabrina Jeffries and Meredith Duran. My favorite snippet is this from Meredith:

“Our genre is often derided as ‘escapist,’ but I think there’s a great and potentially agentive power in escapism if it enables us to realize and articulate our core values. . . . I like to think that the romance genre, by celebrating the importance of human connection, also helps us embrace and defend the qualities that engender human connection in the world.”

Photo: Meredith Duran

Meredith Duran

Photo: Sabrina Jeffries

Sabrina Jeffries

Click here to read the full post, “Historical Chat: Meredith Duran and Sabrina Jeffries Talk Books.”

 

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On arranged marriages

Really enjoyed Madeline Hunter’s thoughtful and wide-ranging post in USA Today‘s Happy Ever After blog, “Romance Unlaced: Authors Explore Beloved Arranged-marriage Trope in Recent Historicals.” Among the authors sharing their perspective are Julia London, Elisabeth Hobbes, and Blythe Gifford.

Graphic for USA Today's Happy Ever After blog

It’s a trope I like a lot too. Obviously. I utilized it in my own You May Kiss the Bride and The Laird Takes a Bride:)

You can read the post here.

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Avon debut sweepstakes!

Here’s another chance to win an advance reader’s copy of You May Kiss the Bride — as well as Tess Diamond’s debut novel of romantic suspense, Dangerous Games. Avon Books is hosting a sweepstakes! Graphic: Avon sweepstakes for two debut authors: Lisa Berne (You May Kiss the Bride) and Tess Diamond (Dangerous Games)

Click here for more info, and to enter. Good luck!

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“A message we all need to hear again and again”

A few days ago, in BookPage, Kristan Higgins published a beautiful essay, “Why Do We Crave a Happily Ever After?” I liked it so much I made a little infographic with a quote from it — like a badge you’d pin onto your blouse. :)

Infographic: a quote from Kristan Higgins on the value of romance novels

Read Kristan’s full post here.

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The one book I can’t wait to read

When I was invited to contribute to this year’s Avon Author Reading Wish List, did I hesitate? Not for a second. Because — hurray! — Loretta Chase has a new book coming out this year!

Avon Romance logo

Katharine Ashe, Sophie Barnes, Megan Frampton, Laura Lee Guhrke, Beverly Jenkins, Jennifer Ryan, Lynsay Sands, and Lori Wilde also shared their Wish List choices. My TBR stack just got bigger . . .

You can read the Wish List here.

 

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Mary Balogh: “I believe in love”

I’ve just read a fantastic post by Mary Balogh on why she writes historical romance; it speaks eloquently to me as both a reader and a writer.

She begins by saying, “I believe in love. I believe in the power and ultimate triumph of love.”

And why historical romance in particular?

“Readers like to be transported away from their everyday lives. They like to be taken to a different world to read about people who are essentially like themselves. Past eras often seem more romantic than our own. Regency England, for example, conjures marvelous visual images of fashions for both men and women that weA Regency-era ballre perhaps the most attractive and sexy of any age; of stately country homes and the spacious parks surrounding them; of horse-drawn carriages bowling along the king’s highway; of couples waltzing at grand balls in the light of dozens of candles in the crystal chandeliers overhead; of enchanted evenings strolling the lantern-lit walks of Vauxhall Gardens in London; of picnics and garden parties in rural surroundings; of drives in Hyde Park at the fashionable hour. The possibilities are endless, all coming with an aura of the romance of a bygone age. It is a happy illusion, of course. Most of us would not want actually to live in Regency England or any other bygone era, but we are quite happy to enjoy it from the comfort of our twenty-first century homes. That is the magic of reading.”

Click here to read the full post.

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