Archive for 'inspiration'

Mary Balogh on the marriage of convenience

Really enjoyed the recent BookPage interview with the wonderful Mary Balogh. One of my favorite questions has to do with the marriage of convenience trope, as it’s something I’ve explored, in differing permutations, in my own books. Interviewer Savanna Walker asks Mary why she thinks it’s such an enduring one. Photo: Mary Balogh

“I think it is at least partly because the couple has to cope almost from the start with the intimacies of marriage, even if they hold off on the sex, while gradually building a friendship and, of course, falling in love,” answers Mary. “Everything is happening at once and the story is likely to be full of emotion and passion with a new couple in close contact with each other all the time. And it is always lovely to see a relationship that seems so unpromising at the start blossom into an enduring love story.”

Mary’s got a new book out, Someone to Wed, which I can’t wait to read. Check out the gorgeous cover!

Cover for Someone to Wed by Mary Balogh

Would you like to read the full interview? Click here. To visit Mary’s website, click here.

 

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A chat with ‘Happy Ever After’

Such a pleasure to be interviewed by Joyce Lamb for the USA Today Happy Ever After blog! In which I dish about The Laird Takes a Bride, inspiration, writer’s block, my next book, a fave TV show, and more . . .

Click here to read the interview. And for more about my books, click here.

Image: cover for The Laird Takes a Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books)Photo: Amy Adams and Matthew Goode in "Leap Year"Photo: Grantchester star James NortonAvon Books logo

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“You can shake the world”

Monday thoughts. :)

Illustration: "In a gentle way, you can shake the world," via Katie Daisy

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Happy weekend!

Here are some great ways in which to spend it. :)

Illustration: "50 Ways to Take a Break"

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Thinking big!

I’ve heard it said that Texans think big, and recently I’ve learned of one awesome way they do: elaborate homecoming corsages! Check ’em out:

via the Wall Street Journal

via the Wall Street Journal

via NPR

via Jezebel

This is inspiring me to think big this week. Happy Monday. :)

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Monday inspiration

Hope you have a very good week. :)

Image: a cat contemplating a large drawing of a tiger

via Sabrina Jeffries on Twitter

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Read a Romance Month top recs!

One of my favorite RARM features is the author recommendations — discovering new authors from other authors. And my top recs?

  • Sophie Jordan. An author of dazzling imagination and talent. (And a huge inspiration to me.)
  • Anna J. Stewart. Can’t say enough nice things about Anna’s writing. As a fellow author I’m in awe, and as a reader I’m just swept away on a tide of enjoyment.
  • Lenora Bell. Her books are so smart and witty and fun! Am a superfan.

Graphic: Read a Romance Month logoWant to read my full post? Click here.

 

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“Ninja heart sneaks undetected . . .”

This made me laugh. Especially since I’m about to turn off the computer and go out of town, and offline, for a family get-together. TTYL. :)Comic: "Ninja Heart sneaks undetected . . ." by the Awkward Yeti

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More RARM!

That is, a little more from my Read a Romance Month contribution. Please enjoy. :)

 

  1. Tell us about a moment when you felt or were aware of The Power of Romance.

I read my first Georgette Heyer novel when I was fourteen, and even though I understood very little of the period terminology, and in fact barely knew where Bath, England, was, I did manage to decode the erotic disjuncture between what the protagonists are saying, and how they’re actually feeling about each other — how underneath their witty and civilized conversations, and despite the elaborately codified manners of their time, a powerful, primal attraction is drawing them inexorably together. Talk about the sizzling power of romance! It caught me as a teenager — hook, line, and sinker — and, to my joy, has never let me go.

Image: cover of Lady of Quality by Georgette Heyer

 

  1. Tell us about an object that has powerful memories for you.

When I was dating the man who was later to become my husband, as February 14th approached — our first Valentine’s Day together — he asked me what I would like to have as a gift. Flowers, chocolates, jewelry . . . all floated through my mind as obvious possibilities.

But then I thought about what I really wanted. I said, “A bread machine.”

Did he say it was a silly idea, or boring, or an overly prosaic one? No, he went out and got me my very own Breadman. Which to me — then and now — is a powerfully romantic gesture. (By the way, we’re still happily married. And I still use my Breadman, too.)

Photo: bread machine

 

  1. Tell us about a word that has power for you. 

That word is “yes.” To me it signifies hope, forward movement, possibility. So my ongoing goal is to say yes to change. To trying new things. To continue to learn and grow. And finally — yes to writing books which I hope others will enjoy and find meaningful.

 

  1.  Tell us about a powerful book you read this year (or one that’s so powerful you’ve never forgotten it).

The Book of Joy, which features the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu in conversation, is a powerfully inspiring treatise on finding balance and peace in a turbulent world. And I must also mention Sarah MacLean’s just-published Day of the Duchess: a beautifully written, powerful testament to the capacity to both change and wholeheartedly love.

Cover: The Book of Joy

  1. Tell us about a person who’s had a powerful influence on your life.

Jane Austen has long been an influence and an inspiration to me as a reader, a student of history, and as a writer of historical romance. Set in an era during which women all too often had little real power, her books make a radical claim for a woman’s right to independent thought, for the importance of happiness, for the overriding value of love over cool pragmatism. These are compelling — and fun! — issues I like to explore in my own novels set during this time, and I’ve got Austen to thank for boldly leading the way over two hundred years ago.

Image: A speculative “spontaneous composite portrait” of Jane Austen by Lance Bertelsen, Iris Howard Regents Professor in English, University of Texas at Austin.

A speculative “spontaneous composite portrait” of Jane Austen by Lance Bertelsen, Iris Howard Regents Professor in English, University of Texas at Austin

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Want to read my full post, and learn more about all the nifty giveaways? Click here.

 

 

 

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“Bloom from within”

A little bit of inspiration as we begin our week. :)

Illustration: "Bloom from within" by Wild Woman Sisterhood

via Traceyanne McCartney on Twitter

 

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