Archive for 'my books'

Q&A with RT Book Reviews VIP Salon

Thrilled to be featured in RT Book Reviews‘ VIP Salon in conversation with senior editor Emily Walton, who asked some very thoughtful and fun-to-answer questions — about my writing inspiration, characters in You May Kiss the Bride, how I approach research, and more.

Photo: cover of You May Kiss the Bride (Avon Books, April 2017) and author Lisa Berne, via RT Reviews

Image via RT Book Reviews

 

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Word of the day: Fastidious

“Difficult to please,” says Merriam-Webster; also “having complex nutritional requirements.” It’s a wonderfully accurate description of my hero’s grandmother in You May Kiss the Bride.Infographic: a definition of "fastidious" by Merriam-Webster

Here’s a snippet from Chapter 5, in which my heroine discovers just how fastidious her hostess is.

Livia stared dismally at her plate. On it was a mashed turnip cake, three limp mushrooms over which had been spooned a lumpy gray sauce, and half a raw artichoke bottom. Not only did Mrs. Penhallow follow a most peculiar culinary regimen, so were she and Miss Cott forced to endure it as well. It was all because of that repulsive Dr. Wendeburgen, one of Bath’s most eminent physicians and a particular favorite of Mrs. Penhallow. No meat, no fish, no poultry, no milk, no cream, no butter, no eggs, no bread, declared Dr. Wendeburgen. Above all, no desserts! What could be more injurious to the human alimentary tract?

Want to read more? Click here to read Chapter 1.

If you’d like to preorder in advance of the March 27th release, click here.

Plus, Avon Books is hosting two giveaways! Ten print advance reader’s copies are up for grabs on Goodreads. And there’s a sweepstakes, too. Good luck!

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Avon debut sweepstakes!

Here’s another chance to win an advance reader’s copy of You May Kiss the Bride — as well as Tess Diamond’s debut novel of romantic suspense, Dangerous Games. Avon Books is hosting a sweepstakes! Graphic: Avon sweepstakes for two debut authors: Lisa Berne (You May Kiss the Bride) and Tess Diamond (Dangerous Games)

Click here for more info, and to enter. Good luck!

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About that cloak in Chapter 4 . . .

The other day I drifted up from sleep in the wintry early-morning darkness, and the first thing that came to mind — very clearly and distinctly — was the cloak a secondary character in The Laird Takes a Bride wears in Chapter 4

My brain had just served up the realization that it was unlikely that this character would choose this particular cloak, and that I really should change it.

So I did. With satisfaction.

Cartoon via Someecards: "Writer Hard at Work"

It’s true.

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Word of the day: Uncouth

Here’s a useful word I employed in You May Kiss the Bride. Infographic: "uncouth" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

 

My heroine, Livia, betrothed to Gabriel Penhallow, hears the name Alasdair Penhallow mentioned, and asks who that is. Gabriel’s haughty, cantankerous grandmother replies with a sniff:

“He is Gabriel’s cousin, and the head of the Scottish branch of the Penhallows — we here in England have nothing to do with them as they are a backward, uncouth lot. This Alasdair is evidently an utter wastrel and is known, among our own intimate circle, as the black sheep of the family. A highly appropriate term, given the Clans’ apparent obsession with their sheep. For myself, I have never cared for mutton, but Dr. Wendeburgen says under extreme circumstances, such as a fit of sneezing that lasts more than an hour, consuming it in pureed form is of the utmost urgency.”

You’ll meet Alasdair in my next book, The Laird Takes a Bride. You’ll have to decide for yourself if old Mrs. Penhallow is correct in her estimation of him . . .

In the meantime, if you’d like to read an excerpt from You May Kiss the Bride, click here. You can also enter Avon Books’ Goodreads giveaway for 10 print advance reader copies; click here to enter. Good luck!

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Goodreads giveaway!

Happy Valentine’s Day! Avon Books is hosting a giveaway for You May Kiss the Bride, which is a very romantic gesture, don’t you think? :)
Graphic: "Goodreads giveaway, compliments of Avon Books!" Featuring You May Kiss the Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books, April 2017)

Available to U.S. Goodreads members, this giveaway for 10 print advance reader copies started today, and ends on February 21, 2017. Click here to enter. Good luck!

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“A sheer delight”

So happy to share with you the first review for You May Kiss the Bride — and it’s a starred one from Kirkus Reviews!

Infographic: the starred Kirkus review for You May Kiss the Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books, April 2017)

 

This review was published by Kirkus on February 7, 2017.

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You’ve got questions? I’ve got answers!

If you happen to be wondering what I’m currently working on, my strategy for dealing with writer’s block, where I got my idea(s) for You May Kiss the Bride, how I get inspired to write, and if I have any advice for aspiring writers, hop on over to my Goodreads page!

Cover for YOU MAY KISS THE BRIDE by Lisa Berne (Avon/HarperCollins)

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Word of the day: Cantankerous

In You May Kiss the Bride, my hero’s grandmother, Henrietta Penhallow, is definitely cantankerous: she’s arrogant, domineering, and critical.

Infographic: "cantankerous," via Merriam-Webster

 

Here’s a little snippet from Chapter 5, during which my heroine, the penniless orphan Livia Stuart, has begun — under the aegis of old Mrs. Penhallow — her transformation into an elegant Society miss.

One morning, after several new items had arrived (including, to Livia’s intense gratification, a pair of kid slippers with ravishing pink rosettes), she said impulsively to Mrs. Penhallow:

“All this, ma’am, for me? I must thank you.”

The old lady had somehow managed despite her inferior height to look down her nose at Livia. “It is not for, or about, you, young lady,” she replied with her usual hauteur. “Never think that for a moment. It is merely that you are to represent the Penhallows, and standards must be upheld.”

Temporarily cowed by this frigid set-down, Livia submitted to successive applications of Lotion of Ladies of Denmark, Milk of Almonds, and the distilled water from green pineapples, her complexion having been pronounced shockingly brown, and also to the rose oil and white wax for lips deemed repulsively dry and chapped.

Poor Livia!

Want to read a longer excerpt from You May Kiss the Bride? Click here for Chapter 1.

 

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On bagpipes, and my next book

So in my next book, The Laird Takes a Bride, there’s a reference to bagpipes which I gotta say is one of the single best lines I’ve ever written.

"Pipe Practice" by William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1918): a painting of three men with bagpipes.

“Pipe Practice” by William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1918). Via Helen Warlow on Twitter.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work to share it out of context. Which probably makes this a totally unfair teaser. But the good news is that The Laird Takes a Bride arrives this summer! I’m so looking forward to sharing more about it with you as we get closer.

In the meantime, you can preorder the Kindle edition here. (More info about other formats coming soon.)

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