Archive for 'on writing'

Word of the day: Ominous

What a delightful word for a writer. I was glad to utilize it in The Laird Takes a Bride. 

Graphic: "ominous" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster. Blog post via Lisa Berne, author of historical romance.

In this snippet, which appears in Chapter 2, my hero, Alasdair Penhallow, is just about to learn about an arcane clan law which dictates that he must marry, or face dreadful consequences.

As Dame Margery drew near, she noisily banged her stick on the marble floor, causing people nearby to stir, moan, rouse. She passed by Uncle Duff, insen­sate, draped sideways on a chair and his long beard dangling perpendicularly, and muttered audibly, “Ach, the old wastrel!” before turning her piercing and un­blinking stare to Alasdair. Finally she stopped before the dais on which the two great chairs — one for the laird, one (long unoccupied) for his lady — stood. Her silence, Alasdair noticed, had a heavy, expectant, rather ominous sort of quality, and he groaned under his breath. He wasn’t in the mood for drama. Still, he was the laird, and one must be polite, so he cleared his throat and said:

“Good day to you, madam.”

The Laird Takes a Bride releases on August 29th. Want to learn more about it? Click here.

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“She became a butterfly”

My heroine’s journey in The Bride Takes a Groom. Coming your way in spring 2018.
Graphic: "Just when the caterpillar thought her life was over, she became a butterfly."

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Enlightened Bride

As an author of historical romance, naturally I LOVE THIS.

"Enlightened Bride," an image by @KHandozo on Twitter

via @KHandozo on Twitter

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In case you missed it . . .

. . . I had a lovely chat with Bookstr last week via Facebook Live. Want to check it out? Click here.Photo: Lisa Berne, author of You May Kiss the Bride (Avon Books), chats with Bookstr.

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Word of the day: Oracular

A word I’m very fond of, and deployed with great pleasure in The Laird Takes a Bride:

A little voice, solemn, oracular:

You stare at the moon, ever changing. Turn about, lady, turn about.

Graphic: "oracular" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

More about The Laird Takes a Bride, coming your way this August, here.

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Word of the day: Mayhap (update)

A few months ago, here on the blog I wondered if I could utilize this delightful word in one of my books.Infographic: "mayhap" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

As it turns out, I already had. Recently, when I was reading the galleys for The Laird Takes a Bride, I saw that a character named Monty says it. A fact which gives me what is probably an insane amount of joy.

Click here to learn more about The Laird Takes a Bride, which releases on August 29th. You can also preorder and read Chapter 1. Would you like to save it on Goodreads? Click here.

 

 

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Word of the day: Unabashed

This seems like a good word for a romance writer to know. ;)Graphic: "unabashed" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

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“It is a truth universally acknowledged . . .”

“. . . that love is complicated.” What a fun graphic delineating the romantic relationships in Pride and Prejudice.

Graphic: Pride and Prejudice romantic relationships, via Shmoop

via the Jane Austen Centre

Speaking of Jane Austen, you may also enjoy my Bookish post on why she is a huge source of inspiration to romance novelists everywhere.

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Prologues: yes or no?

It’s Thursday, which means it’s official Getting To Know You Day on my Facebook page! Last week we jumped into the question of our favorite movies (which added quite a lot of titles to my to-watch list). Today we’re tackling a question readers and writers can feel very strongly about . . .Graphic: "Prologues - love them or skip them?" Via Lisa Berne

Would you like to add your two cents? Join us. :)

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Word of the day: Finesse

A delightful word, full of interesting connotations.Graphic: "Finesse" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

I used it in You May Kiss the Bride, in the scene in which my protagonists meet for the first time. They are in the woods, and Livia has just paused, having unexpectedly come across a doe and a stag. Here comes Gabriel Penhallow: with little echoes from Jane Eyre and the ’95 version of Pride and Prejudice, when we get our first glimpse of Mr. Darcy, on horseback and clearly a very capable rider.

. . . there came the unmistakable sound of hoofbeats. The doe darted in one direction, the stag another, directly across the path where a rider had come and startling his immense black horse, which reared in alarm, deadly sharp hooves flying out, and was promptly reined in, in a display of strength and finesse that Livia watched with a kind of fascinated alarm.

This snippet appears in Chapter 2, but if you like, you can read all of Chapter 1 here.

Interested in ordering You May Kiss the Bride? Click here to see your various options in print, ebook, and audio.

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