Archive for 'on writing'

Inspiration!

In case you missed it from my recent newsletter: I’m envisioning the hero of the book I’m currently writing — The Worst Duke in the World — looking like a combination of these two delightful fellas.

Photo: Daniel Day-Lewis in Last of the MohicansPhoto: Simon Woods in Pride and Prejudice

I do hope you approve. ;)

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#100DaysOfGreatBooks!

Happy Saturday, friends! I’m SUUUUUUUPER excited to be featured in Read A Romance Month‘s #100DaysOfGreatBooks today! You’re cordially invited to take a look — you’ll learn about the most courageous thing I’ve ever done, why I write romance, fellow authors whose work I love . . . PLUS a sneak peek at the cover of my next book, Engaged to the Earl, the fourth in the Penhallow Dynasty series . . . AND a title reveal for the 5th book!

Click here to check it out.

Graphic: "A masterful Regency debut . . . A sheer delight." -Kirkus Reviews (starred) for You May Kiss the Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books)

 

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My hero!

As I’m writing, I like to have some kind of visual inspiration for my protagonists. Here’s how I sort of picture the hero in my next book, Engaged to the Earl.

Photograph: Richard Rankin

What do you think? Are you inspired, too? ;)

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What makes a heroine?

This is something I think about a lot, both as a reader and a writer. What qualities do we like to see — maybe even insist on seeing — in heroines we like, love, respect, and admire?

Graphic: What makes a heroine? LisaBerne.com

Intelligence, kindness, a big heart, a lively sense of humor: these are big on my list. What about on yours?

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McDreamy!

This photo recently crossed my newsfeed. And boy, do I want to write a romance novel with this guy as my hero. ♥

Photo: Patrick Dempsey

 

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Word of the day: gargantuan

An excellent word! I used it with pleasure in The Laird Takes a Brideand in one of my very favorite bits in the whole book.

Graphic: "gargantuan" and its definition

In this passage, my heroine Fiona Douglass is attending her 71st wedding, and thinking about some of her experiences as an observer. Here’s one of them:

Seven years ago, old Mrs. Gibbs, aged ninety-eight and heartily disliked by nearly everyone in the entire clan, had loudly expired just before the vows were spoken. The general agreement was that she’d done it deliberately in a last triumphant bid for attention, and that she was likely chuckling up in heaven (or down below in the other place) because afterwards, as her corpse was being removed, her pet ferret had crawled out from a pocket in her skirt and dashed up the towering headdress of a haughty dowager from Glasgow, from which vantage point it had leaped gracefully onto the shoulder of Fiona’s own mother, who had screamed and then fainted, sending the bride into hysterics and several small boys into par­oxysms of noisy laughter, thereby provoking Fiona’s father, the mighty chieftain of clan Douglass, into a fury so awful that the wedding was quietly called off and no one dared to partake of the gargantuan feast laid out in the Great Hall, resulting, of course, in a great deal of secret rejoicing in the servants’ hall for at least three days after that. The ferret was never seen again.Graphic: "A bright, intelligent, heart-tugging romance": Kirkus review for The Laird Takes a Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books)

This snippet appears in the first chapter of The Laird Takes a Bride. Would you like to read the entire chapter? Click here. And to see some of the nice things people have been saying about it, click here.

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Plot bunny!

The caption, via @moodvintage on Twitter: “Late Victorian mountaineers, including a lady fully dressed and corseted, cross a crevasse in the Alps, 1900.”

Photo: "Late Victorian mountaineers" via @moodvintage

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Newsletter alert!

Coming soon in my next newsletter . . . an exclusive (and very fun!) interview with one of my favorite authors, the super-talented Anna J. Stewart. Anna writes sweet to sexy romance for Harlequin’s Heartwarming and Romantic Suspense lines, is an RWA Golden Heart nominee and Daphne Du Maurier Award for Excellence finalist, and a USA Today and national bestselling author.

Graphic: Interview with Anna J. Stewart and a giveaway. Via Lisa BerneHere are some of the questions I’m asking Anna:

 

  • If you weren’t a romance author, what else would you be doing?
  • Do you have an all-time favorite book in the world?
  • Can you tell us about your upcoming books?
  • Any advice for an aspiring writer?
  • Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so, how do you overcome it?
  • Who or what are your literary influences?

I’m also giving away three print copies of Anna’s The Rancher’s Homecoming. (Don’t you just love the gorgeous cover?!?) Subscribers to my newsletter are automatically entered into the giveaway.

If you aren’t a subscriber yet, would you like to be? There’s an easy-peasy form on my website as well as on my Facebook page.

Want to learn more about Anna and her books? Visit her at her website.

 

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“How to take a great author photo”

A behind-the-scenes look at the writing life. ;)

Graphic: "How to take a great author photo"

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Word of the day: blench

A word I love! I used it with pleasure in You May Kiss the Bride, in a scene in which we learn how my hero’s haughty grandmother has triedGraphic: "blench" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster very hard to find him a suitable wife.

Some months ago she had left Bath—where she’d been ensconced for many years—and made her way to London. There she had taken occupancy of the family townhouse in Berkeley Square and proceeded to spend the Season looking for a worthy young lady. Invited everywhere and universally fawned upon, she attended breakfasts, teas, dinner parties, assemblies, balls, Almack’s; indefatigably had she searched, interviewed, investigated. Her letters came to him bristling with detailed reports.

Angrily, she wrote that this earl’s daughter was already affianced, and that duke’s girl had just gotten married; their available sisters were too young, or too old, or had a squint, or teeth that made one blench. The girls of a fine old family from the North would have been considered if not for their abject lack of fortune.

One otherwise promising young lady, Grandmama had learned to her fury, had been concealing the ugly fact of an uncle in the fishmongering trade. The granddaughter of an old friend, whom she had long thought to be a possibility, looked decidedly consumptive. Another girl who had seemed likely at first came from a family in which the women were notoriously poor breeders. And, naturally, there were whole swathes of young ladies who could be ignored—no matter how wealthy or pleasing in appearance—as their bloodlines were pitifully inferior.

On and on it went, until at last the Season had come to an end, and Grandmama returned to Bath in defeat.Cover for You May Kiss the Bride by Lisa Berne (Avon Books)

This is a snippet from Chapter 1, but if you like, you can read all of the chapter here. Would you like to order You May Kiss the Bride? Click here for more info.

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