Archive for 'on writing'

“She became a butterfly”

My heroine’s journey in The Bride Takes a Groom. Coming your way in spring 2018.
Graphic: "Just when the caterpillar thought her life was over, she became a butterfly."

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Enlightened Bride

As an author of historical romance, naturally I LOVE THIS.

"Enlightened Bride," an image by @KHandozo on Twitter

via @KHandozo on Twitter

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In case you missed it . . .

. . . I had a lovely chat with Bookstr last week via Facebook Live. Want to check it out? Click here.Photo: Lisa Berne, author of You May Kiss the Bride (Avon Books), chats with Bookstr.

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Word of the day: Oracular

A word I’m very fond of, and deployed with great pleasure in The Laird Takes a Bride:

A little voice, solemn, oracular:

You stare at the moon, ever changing. Turn about, lady, turn about.

Graphic: "oracular" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

More about The Laird Takes a Bride, coming your way this August, here.

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Word of the day: Mayhap (update)

A few months ago, here on the blog I wondered if I could utilize this delightful word in one of my books.Infographic: "mayhap" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

As it turns out, I already had. Recently, when I was reading the galleys for The Laird Takes a Bride, I saw that a character named Monty says it. A fact which gives me what is probably an insane amount of joy.

Click here to learn more about The Laird Takes a Bride, which releases on August 29th. You can also preorder and read Chapter 1. Would you like to save it on Goodreads? Click here.

 

 

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Word of the day: Unabashed

This seems like a good word for a romance writer to know. ;)Graphic: "unabashed" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

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“It is a truth universally acknowledged . . .”

“. . . that love is complicated.” What a fun graphic delineating the romantic relationships in Pride and Prejudice.

Graphic: Pride and Prejudice romantic relationships, via Shmoop

via the Jane Austen Centre

Speaking of Jane Austen, you may also enjoy my Bookish post on why she is a huge source of inspiration to romance novelists everywhere.

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Prologues: yes or no?

It’s Thursday, which means it’s official Getting To Know You Day on my Facebook page! Last week we jumped into the question of our favorite movies (which added quite a lot of titles to my to-watch list). Today we’re tackling a question readers and writers can feel very strongly about . . .Graphic: "Prologues - love them or skip them?" Via Lisa Berne

Would you like to add your two cents? Join us. :)

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Word of the day: Finesse

A delightful word, full of interesting connotations.Graphic: "Finesse" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

I used it in You May Kiss the Bride, in the scene in which my protagonists meet for the first time. They are in the woods, and Livia has just paused, having unexpectedly come across a doe and a stag. Here comes Gabriel Penhallow: with little echoes from Jane Eyre and the ’95 version of Pride and Prejudice, when we get our first glimpse of Mr. Darcy, on horseback and clearly a very capable rider.

. . . there came the unmistakable sound of hoofbeats. The doe darted in one direction, the stag another, directly across the path where a rider had come and startling his immense black horse, which reared in alarm, deadly sharp hooves flying out, and was promptly reined in, in a display of strength and finesse that Livia watched with a kind of fascinated alarm.

This snippet appears in Chapter 2, but if you like, you can read all of Chapter 1 here.

Interested in ordering You May Kiss the Bride? Click here to see your various options in print, ebook, and audio.

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Introverts ‘live it up on the inside’

One of my favorite parts of the romance panel I moderated at the Get Lit festival last month was hearing the panelists — Asa Maria Bradley, Tamara Morgan, Katee Robert, and Rebecca Zanetti — describe where they each fall on the introspection/extroversion continuum. Writing tends to be an intensely solitary experience across long periods of time, so it makes sense that a writer has to at least be comfortable with introversion.

On the heels of this I was fascinated to read a recent “Advice Goddess” column in which Amy Alkon discusses the topic. She refutes the idea that introverts are somehow ‘less than’ their more outgoing counterparts.

“They’re not,” she says. “They’re differently functional. Brain imaging research by cognitive scientist Debra L. Johnson and her colleagues found that in introverts, sensory input from experience led to more blood flow in the brain (amounting to more stimulation). The path it took was longer and twistier than in extroverts and had a different destination: frontal areas we use for inward thinking like planning, remembering, and problem-solving. So, introverts live it up, too; they just do it on the inside.”

Alkon continues: “Extroverts’ brain scans revealed a more direct path for stimuli — with blood flowing straight to rear areas of the brain used for sensory processing, like listening and touching. They also have less overall blood flow — translating (in combination with a different neurochemical response) to a need for more social hoo-ha to be ‘fed.’”

More about the always-enlightening Amy Alkon here.

Amy Alkon, also known as the "Advice Goddess"

 

 

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