Archive for 'on writing'

Some beautiful images from Pride & Prejudice

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice plays a small role in You May Kiss the Brideso I was especially delighted to come across these images from the Folio Society’s recently published edition of P & P. Aren’t they spectacular?

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy dancing, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet being confronted by Lady Catherine, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)An illustration of Elizabeth Bennet looking at a portrait of Mr. Darcy, by Anna and Elena Balbusso. From Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (The Folio Society)

 

The artists are Anna and Elena Balbusso. More here.

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Word of the day: Baleful

Another excellent word for a romance writer, in whose work tensions often run high. A Merriam-Webster infographic, with a definition for the word "baleful"

I used it at least once, in adverbial form, in You May Kiss the Bride:

Livia looked balefully at the rumpled heap of expensive, fragile gowns lying on the floor. So Cecily thought one of her old cast-offs might suit her for the ball? And Lady Glanville thought that she’d be thrilled, grateful, to peek out from behind a potted palm to enjoy a glimpse of luxury?

Well, they were wrong. 

Dead wrong. 

Livia jumped to her feet and went over to the gowns. She snatched them up and shoved them onto a low shelf of her armoire. 

She was not going to the ball. 

This snippet appears in Chapter 1. You can read the full excerpt here.

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Mary/Eloisa on writing romance

I always love to hear what Eloisa James has to say about her books, writing, and creative process. Julie Tetel Andresen recently interviewed Eloisa — or, really, Professor Mary Bly — and I especially enjoyed this pearl from Mary/Eloisa:

“. . . romance has a rhythm and a promise to it that appeals to me. Romance reminds me that if there’s a pattern to the universe, it’s shaped around and by love. We can all use that reminder now and again.”

An image of Eloisa James/Professor Mary Bly, famous author of historical romance

Read the full interview here.

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“Get off the computer now and again”

“Get off the computer now and again.” It’s not always so easy for writers to do, especially for those who — like me — try to write every day. But tomorrow I’m off for a nice long holiday visit with family, and I’ve vowed to be offline the whole time.

"Get off the computer now and again": an illustration by Lizzy Stewart.

illustration by Lizzy Stewart

More from me again a bit further down the road. In the meantime, here’s a link to the site of the wonderfully talented Lizzy Stewart.

 

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Word of the day: Impetuous

Here’s another excellent word for a romance writer. For example, in You May Kiss the Bride, impetuous behavior on the part of both Gabriel and Livia catapults them into an unexpected betrothal — much to their mutual dismay.A Merriam-Webster infographic for the word "impetuous."

 

Curious to meet them? You can read Chapter 1 here.

 

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The Land of Neckcloths

Yes, yes, I know the figures aren’t grounded in the same plane, but whatever. I love this collage! I’m writing Regency-era historicals and dwelling, as it were, in the Land of Neckcloths. So it’s kind of like a vision board.

A collage showing various actors who have portrayed Jane Austen's male characters in recent years. Via the Jane Austen Centre on Twitter.

via the Jane Austen Centre on Twitter

More about the Jane Austen Centre here.

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Fight for the fairy tale

This is a kind of manifesto, isn’t it — for writers and readers of romance?

"Fight for the fairy tale": a meme by Joy F.

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Word of the day: Wistful

This is an excellent word for a romance writer to deploy. One of my characters, for example, is feeling this right now. But not to worry — all will end well. :)

"Wistful": a word of the day infographic via Merriam-Webster.

 

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