Archive for 'reading'

Book love: Rules for a Rogue

I recently had the pleasure of reading Rules for a Rogue by Christy Carlyle, a new-to-me author, and I wanted to tell you about it. I fell in love with the protagonists, Phee and Kit, and Christy’s writing is just beautiful. Also, the cover is spectacular. That gown!

Cover for RULES FOR A ROGUE by Christy Carlyle, published by Avon Impulse

Christy has a new book coming out next week, A Study in Scoundrels, which I’m so excited to read. And please enjoy this equally spectacular cover!

cover image: A Study in Scoundrels by Christy Carlyle

More about Christy here.

 

 

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Book love: Recipe for Redemption

I recently had the pleasure of reading a fantastic contemporary romance novel, Recipe for Redemption, by Anna J. Stewart. Anna’s writing style is so compulsively readable, and her characters so vividly drawn, that I absolutely had to read this in one sitting.


And Anna’s got a new book coming out in May, which I’m super-excited to read. Check out this stunning cover!

 

To learn more about Anna and her other books, click here.

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This is totally me

And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

"The Complete Journey" by Jonathan Wolstenholme

“The Complete Journey” by Jonathan Wolstenholme

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The one book I can’t wait to read

When I was invited to contribute to this year’s Avon Author Reading Wish List, did I hesitate? Not for a second. Because — hurray! — Loretta Chase has a new book coming out this year!

Avon Romance logo

Katharine Ashe, Sophie Barnes, Megan Frampton, Laura Lee Guhrke, Beverly Jenkins, Jennifer Ryan, Lynsay Sands, and Lori Wilde also shared their Wish List choices. My TBR stack just got bigger . . .

You can read the Wish List here.

 

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Mary Balogh: “I believe in love”

I’ve just read a fantastic post by Mary Balogh on why she writes historical romance; it speaks eloquently to me as both a reader and a writer.

She begins by saying, “I believe in love. I believe in the power and ultimate triumph of love.”

And why historical romance in particular?

“Readers like to be transported away from their everyday lives. They like to be taken to a different world to read about people who are essentially like themselves. Past eras often seem more romantic than our own. Regency England, for example, conjures marvelous visual images of fashions for both men and women that weA Regency-era ballre perhaps the most attractive and sexy of any age; of stately country homes and the spacious parks surrounding them; of horse-drawn carriages bowling along the king’s highway; of couples waltzing at grand balls in the light of dozens of candles in the crystal chandeliers overhead; of enchanted evenings strolling the lantern-lit walks of Vauxhall Gardens in London; of picnics and garden parties in rural surroundings; of drives in Hyde Park at the fashionable hour. The possibilities are endless, all coming with an aura of the romance of a bygone age. It is a happy illusion, of course. Most of us would not want actually to live in Regency England or any other bygone era, but we are quite happy to enjoy it from the comfort of our twenty-first century homes. That is the magic of reading.”

Click here to read the full post.

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It’s finished!

Me, after I’ve finished a book I totally love.

"Jove Decadent" by Ramon Casas i Carbo.

“Jove Decadent” by Ramon Casas i Carbo

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People who use bookmarks . . . and monsters

I have to admit two things. One: I’m a total bookmark person. (Almost anything will work in a pinch: envelopes, receipts, a movie ticket, Post-it notes, a piece of string . . .) Two: I have gotten huffy when people have dog-eared books I’m fond of.

A cartoon: There are two types of people. People who use bookmarks . . . and monsters.

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My entire childhood

I’m so wowed by this. It feels like my entire childhood, coalesced into a single image.

Illustration showing the imaginative power of books and reading.

via Helen Warlow on Twitter

 

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Happy birthday, Ma!

I’m a day late, but yesterday was the birthday of Caroline Ingalls — Ma in the Little House series. A towering, indelible figure of my childhood reading: stern but loving, a little mysterious, hardworking, and almost supernaturally resourceful.

A photograph of Caroline Ingalls, mother of Laura Ingalls Wilder, the author of the Little House series of children's books

Pa & Ma: photo via Little House Prairie on Twitter

More about “Ma” here: “Mother, A Magic Word.”

 

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Some helpfully abridged classics

For those of us short on time.

"(even more) abridged classics": a comic by John Atkinson, Wrong Hands

via John Atkinson, Wrong Hands

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