Archive for 'romance'

Word of the day: Ominous

What a delightful word for a writer. I was glad to utilize it in The Laird Takes a Bride. 

Graphic: "ominous" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster. Blog post via Lisa Berne, author of historical romance.

In this snippet, which appears in Chapter 2, my hero, Alasdair Penhallow, is just about to learn about an arcane clan law which dictates that he must marry, or face dreadful consequences.

As Dame Margery drew near, she noisily banged her stick on the marble floor, causing people nearby to stir, moan, rouse. She passed by Uncle Duff, insen­sate, draped sideways on a chair and his long beard dangling perpendicularly, and muttered audibly, “Ach, the old wastrel!” before turning her piercing and un­blinking stare to Alasdair. Finally she stopped before the dais on which the two great chairs — one for the laird, one (long unoccupied) for his lady — stood. Her silence, Alasdair noticed, had a heavy, expectant, rather ominous sort of quality, and he groaned under his breath. He wasn’t in the mood for drama. Still, he was the laird, and one must be polite, so he cleared his throat and said:

“Good day to you, madam.”

The Laird Takes a Bride releases on August 29th. Want to learn more about it? Click here.

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“She became a butterfly”

My heroine’s journey in The Bride Takes a Groom. Coming your way in spring 2018.
Graphic: "Just when the caterpillar thought her life was over, she became a butterfly."

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Enlightened Bride

As an author of historical romance, naturally I LOVE THIS.

"Enlightened Bride," an image by @KHandozo on Twitter

via @KHandozo on Twitter

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Word of the day: Oracular

A word I’m very fond of, and deployed with great pleasure in The Laird Takes a Bride:

A little voice, solemn, oracular:

You stare at the moon, ever changing. Turn about, lady, turn about.

Graphic: "oracular" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

More about The Laird Takes a Bride, coming your way this August, here.

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Word of the day: Mayhap (update)

A few months ago, here on the blog I wondered if I could utilize this delightful word in one of my books.Infographic: "mayhap" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

As it turns out, I already had. Recently, when I was reading the galleys for The Laird Takes a Bride, I saw that a character named Monty says it. A fact which gives me what is probably an insane amount of joy.

Click here to learn more about The Laird Takes a Bride, which releases on August 29th. You can also preorder and read Chapter 1. Would you like to save it on Goodreads? Click here.

 

 

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Word of the day: Unabashed

This seems like a good word for a romance writer to know. ;)Graphic: "unabashed" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

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Word of the day: Finesse

A delightful word, full of interesting connotations.Graphic: "Finesse" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster

I used it in You May Kiss the Bride, in the scene in which my protagonists meet for the first time. They are in the woods, and Livia has just paused, having unexpectedly come across a doe and a stag. Here comes Gabriel Penhallow: with little echoes from Jane Eyre and the ’95 version of Pride and Prejudice, when we get our first glimpse of Mr. Darcy, on horseback and clearly a very capable rider.

. . . there came the unmistakable sound of hoofbeats. The doe darted in one direction, the stag another, directly across the path where a rider had come and startling his immense black horse, which reared in alarm, deadly sharp hooves flying out, and was promptly reined in, in a display of strength and finesse that Livia watched with a kind of fascinated alarm.

This snippet appears in Chapter 2, but if you like, you can read all of Chapter 1 here.

Interested in ordering You May Kiss the Bride? Click here to see your various options in print, ebook, and audio.

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Shop talk: Patty Blount on the three stories
Author Patty Blount recently commented on the craft of writing romance novels, and I found what she said to be so insightful, so perceptive, that I’m keen to share it:

 

Writing romance is among the most challenging genres because you’re actually writing three stories. His and Hers (or His and His, Hers and Hers, depending on your sub-genre). 

Two main characters. Two trajectories and two distinct story arcs.

The third story is their romance itself.

It really fries my tomatoes when industry critics dismiss romance as bodice-rippers and lady porn and so on because that fact is often missed. Every romance novel has three stories that don’t just intersect . . . they become enmeshed, melded, just as relationships do.

We start off with one character immersed in his world, his problems, his wounds. Then, we cut to the other character and get the same experience. What makes romance so unique and so powerful, in my opinion, is how we authors craft these two people so that the story isn’t simply “Person Meets Love Interest.”

It’s Person Struggling Through Life

Meets Another Person Struggling Through Life

and Learns How To Love This Person Despite/Because of Those Struggles

So That Their Ending Feels Like a Beginning

That’s the Third story . . . the love that develops between these two characters has to be real and be forever and that kind of love becomes its own story.

That’s not just good writing, it’s magic.

Photo: Patty BlountMore about Patty here.
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Book love: My Fair Duchess

I recently had the pleasure of reading Megan Frampton’s wonderful historical romance My Fair Duchess. I love Megan’s writing style; her voice is so distinctive, and she imbues her story with clever wit and “you are there” vividness. Her protagonists, Genevieve and Archie, are such interesting and nuanced characters that it’s a joy to follow them along to their well-deserved happy-ever-after.

Cover for My Fair Duchess by Megan Frampton

More about Megan here.

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“Are you reading a romance novel?”

Hahaha."Are you reading a romance novel?" A Baby Blues comic strip.

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