Archive for 'romance'

Word of the Day: Beguile

A terrific word for a romance writer, don’t you think? Infographic: "Beguile" and its definition, via Merriam-Webster.

I used it a variant of it in You May Kiss the Bride:

Clearly, there was more to that exasperating man than only stubborn arrogance. Livia began to feel regretful at parting from him two days ago in the Pump Room with what she had to now admit was outright churlishness. But he had bowed over her hand with such cool remoteness, and had given no indication as to his plans.

Oh, she must, and would, thank him as soon as next she saw him! She would be very proper and aloof, of course, but gracious. Not unlike an empress acknowledging a worthy gesture from a subordinate. That would be the ideal note to strike. And she would not, absolutely would not, lose her temper.

Caught up in this beguiling vision of herself, Livia jumped when Mrs. Penhallow rapped her knuckles on the table, and turned startled eyes to her hostess.

“I daresay you had a very good reason for ignoring me,” said the old lady with withering sarcasm. “Perhaps you were wondering what the dessert course will be?”

She hadn’t, but now she was, although clearly it would be unwise to ask. 

This snippet appears in Chapter 6. But, if you like, you can read all of Chapter 1 here.

 

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The Museum of Broken Relationships

I was fascinated to read an article about the Museum of Broken Relationships, which houses “artifacts from failed unions, most of them mundane under ordinary circumstances. A single stiletto heel. A wine opener. A worn old Snoopy doll. But when isolated in a glass case or hanging on a white wall and accompanied by a caption, the objects become imbued with heartache or regret. Or freedom.” As an avid museum-goer, I’d love to visit.

A photograph taken at the Museum of Broken Relationships: visitors looking at a display of "brokenship" artifacts.

via the Museum of Broken Relationships

Of course, one of the great joys in my profession is to ensure that no matter what obstacles my protagonists encounter, all will end well. Hmmmm. Maybe they should stock some romance novels in the gift shop . . . ?

More about the “brokenships” museum here.

 

 

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Word of the day: Maelstrom

Here’s a fantastic word for a romance writer, as our work is imbued with emotions of all kinds, and often very strong ones.Infographic: "Maelstrom": a word-of-the-day from Merriam-Webster.

In fact, I used it in You May Kiss the BrideMy hero, Gabriel Penhallow, who has previously taken great pride in his cool sangfroid, has just had a public — and widely observed — altercation on a busy street in Bath, during which he effectively rips to shreds the character of a man whose carriage has nearly run over my heroine Livia:

So much for his vaunted self-control, he thought bitterly. The last time he’d allowed himself to give way to such a violent maelstrom of emotions, he’d ended up kissing a saucy, tempting girl in a garden and within the hour been engaged to her. And here she’d done it once more.

This snippet is from Chapter 9, but you if you like, you can read Chapter 1 here.

 

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It was a dark and stormy night . . .

Although I don’t write gothic romance, I’ve certainly read it, and I adore this evocative image. Are these steps ones you’d want to go up . . . or hastily down, and away?

Gothic-style illustration of an old manor house by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

Illustration by Wildred Jenkins; via Helen Warlow on Twitter

 

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Word of the day: Baleful

Another excellent word for a romance writer, in whose work tensions often run high. A Merriam-Webster infographic, with a definition for the word "baleful"

I used it at least once, in adverbial form, in You May Kiss the Bride:

Livia looked balefully at the rumpled heap of expensive, fragile gowns lying on the floor. So Cecily thought one of her old cast-offs might suit her for the ball? And Lady Glanville thought that she’d be thrilled, grateful, to peek out from behind a potted palm to enjoy a glimpse of luxury?

Well, they were wrong. 

Dead wrong. 

Livia jumped to her feet and went over to the gowns. She snatched them up and shoved them onto a low shelf of her armoire. 

She was not going to the ball. 

This snippet appears in Chapter 1. You can read the full excerpt here.

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Mary/Eloisa on writing romance

I always love to hear what Eloisa James has to say about her books, writing, and creative process. Julie Tetel Andresen recently interviewed Eloisa — or, really, Professor Mary Bly — and I especially enjoyed this pearl from Mary/Eloisa:

“. . . romance has a rhythm and a promise to it that appeals to me. Romance reminds me that if there’s a pattern to the universe, it’s shaped around and by love. We can all use that reminder now and again.”

An image of Eloisa James/Professor Mary Bly, famous author of historical romance

Read the full interview here.

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Word of the day: Impetuous

Here’s another excellent word for a romance writer. For example, in You May Kiss the Bride, impetuous behavior on the part of both Gabriel and Livia catapults them into an unexpected betrothal — much to their mutual dismay.A Merriam-Webster infographic for the word "impetuous."

 

Curious to meet them? You can read Chapter 1 here.

 

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Fight for the fairy tale

This is a kind of manifesto, isn’t it — for writers and readers of romance?

"Fight for the fairy tale": a meme by Joy F.

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