Archive for the 'News & blog' Category

Getting to know you

It’s Thursday, which means it’s official Getting To Know You day on my Facebook page, where we talk about all kinds of fun things including dogs vs. cats, dream vacations, our favorite meals, what we’re currently reading, and more. Here’s today’s question. Would you like to join the conversation? Hop right on in. :)

Graphic: Do you have a favorite movie? Via Lisa Berne

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Have you read it . . . ?

If you’ve read You May Kiss the Bride, how would you feel about writing a review on Goodreads and/or Amazon? If you haven’t already, that is, and if those are places you frequent, and, most importantly, if it would be fun for you. It’s a fantastic way to spread the word, and help You May Kiss the Bride find new readers. Thank you!

Have you read You May Kiss the Bride? (by Lisa Berne, Avon Books)

 

And, of course, I’d love to hear from you directly! I’m on Facebook and Twitter, and you can always email me at lisa @ lisaberne.com (without spaces).

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Introverts ‘live it up on the inside’

One of my favorite parts of the romance panel I moderated at the Get Lit festival last month was hearing the panelists — Asa Maria Bradley, Tamara Morgan, Katee Robert, and Rebecca Zanetti — describe where they each fall on the introspection/extroversion continuum. Writing tends to be an intensely solitary experience across long periods of time, so it makes sense that a writer has to at least be comfortable with introversion.

On the heels of this I was fascinated to read a recent “Advice Goddess” column in which Amy Alkon discusses the topic. She refutes the idea that introverts are somehow ‘less than’ their more outgoing counterparts.

“They’re not,” she says. “They’re differently functional. Brain imaging research by cognitive scientist Debra L. Johnson and her colleagues found that in introverts, sensory input from experience led to more blood flow in the brain (amounting to more stimulation). The path it took was longer and twistier than in extroverts and had a different destination: frontal areas we use for inward thinking like planning, remembering, and problem-solving. So, introverts live it up, too; they just do it on the inside.”

Alkon continues: “Extroverts’ brain scans revealed a more direct path for stimuli — with blood flowing straight to rear areas of the brain used for sensory processing, like listening and touching. They also have less overall blood flow — translating (in combination with a different neurochemical response) to a need for more social hoo-ha to be ‘fed.’”

More about the always-enlightening Amy Alkon here.

Amy Alkon, also known as the "Advice Goddess"

 

 

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Rise and shine

Happy Monday. :)"Rise and shine": a graphic by Katie Daisy

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Happy Mother’s Day!

Thinking with love of mothers everywhere. 
Photo: a mother elephant and her baby, trunks intertwined

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Shop talk: Patty Blount on the three stories
Author Patty Blount recently commented on the craft of writing romance novels, and I found what she said to be so insightful, so perceptive, that I’m keen to share it:

 

Writing romance is among the most challenging genres because you’re actually writing three stories. His and Hers (or His and His, Hers and Hers, depending on your sub-genre). 

Two main characters. Two trajectories and two distinct story arcs.

The third story is their romance itself.

It really fries my tomatoes when industry critics dismiss romance as bodice-rippers and lady porn and so on because that fact is often missed. Every romance novel has three stories that don’t just intersect . . . they become enmeshed, melded, just as relationships do.

We start off with one character immersed in his world, his problems, his wounds. Then, we cut to the other character and get the same experience. What makes romance so unique and so powerful, in my opinion, is how we authors craft these two people so that the story isn’t simply “Person Meets Love Interest.”

It’s Person Struggling Through Life

Meets Another Person Struggling Through Life

and Learns How To Love This Person Despite/Because of Those Struggles

So That Their Ending Feels Like a Beginning

That’s the Third story . . . the love that develops between these two characters has to be real and be forever and that kind of love becomes its own story.

That’s not just good writing, it’s magic.

Photo: Patty BlountMore about Patty here.
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A writer’s brain

Hahaha, seems about right. Comic: "A Writer's Brain"

 

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Getting to know you

It’s Thursday, which means it’s official Getting To Know You day on my Facebook page, where we talk about all kinds of fun things including books (of course), dogs vs. cats, dream vacations, our favorite meals, and more. Would you like to join the conversation? Hop right on in. :)Graphic: "What are you reading?" Via Lisa Berne, author of the Penhallow Dynasty series (Avon Books)

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“Give me the inspiration of a butterfly”

A lovely illumination of the creative process by Grant Snider."Give me the inspiration of a butterfly": a comic by Grant Snider

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A title for Book 3!

I’m so excited to share with you the title for the third book in the Penhallow Dynasty series! Drum roll, please . . . Graphic: The Bride Takes the Groom, the third book in the Penhallow Dynasty series by Lisa Berne (Avon Books)

If you’ve read You May Kiss the Bride, you’ll have met Captain Hugo Penhallow, cousin to Gabriel Penhallow: he makes a dramatic appearance toward the end of the story. Now it’s Hugo’s turn to find his happily-ever-after . . .

Would you like to mark this as “to read” on Goodreads? Click here.

 

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